The true cost of Cheap Quality


Before I sign off on this weeks newsletter – I wanted to show you this. On Monday night, I put up a post on Facebook with the image above. I took this shot earlier this week at a local free camp area and I wrote something along the lines of: The impact that cheap quality camping gear has on our planet is horrifying – it totally stews me up in the gut! “Do we save a few dollars now on cheap quality items at the expensive of our 
children’s future?”  The post got some really good comments and as you can imagine… they all varied considerably! What really surprised me, was the different things that everyone took out of that short blurb, and I loved that by the way… “Wouldn’t life be boring if we all thought the same?”  There was blame on those who rubbished, positive comments on the understanding of value received when quality is purchased and comments quoted around budget determining choice (and many more great individual opinions). 

Interestingly I had a mate call me after reading my post and we had a good chat about it (we are in the same industry). He made a couple of interesting remarks, “quality doesn’t necessarily mean expensive – I wonder if people understand this?”  He then said something else that struck a real cord with me, “he hates wasting money – rather than buy cheap quality and throw it in the bin, he and his wife always save until they can afford better quality.”  

We don’t see that a lot anymore – consumerism has taken over – we really are in a world where many of us have to have it now… and often at any cost. Do we truly understand that cost? What is that cost? Or an even better question to ask – who is to pay for that cost?  I guess that if we knew that cost would be given to our future generations (our kids and grandkids), would we keep buying cheap quality and burying it in our earth after little to no use? 

I would love to hear your thoughts – let me know what you think below. Before you do, I would love to hear your opinion on this “can we truly afford to buy cheap quality?” 

Cheers!

Jarrod.

2 Comments

  • Vicki Lea says:

    If you want something to last you for years then you have to buy better quality, as it’s an investment. Have a caravan now but I always checked quality of fabric and poles before we bought, and as our family changed and we bought bigger we were always able to give our old tent away to family as it was still in good condition. However – you have some that want to try camping out or that need something in a hurry that will buy the cheaper tent – what they don’t realise is that the cheap tents can be the reason they don’t camp again! Like everything, experience is gained by trying. I camped when I was a child, so I had my parents experience to go by – likewise so do my children.
    We went camping up to inskip point a few weeks ago before Cyclone Debbie hit and we had a few nights of heavy rain and it was disappointing to see that people had left there broken tents partially set up for someone else to pull down, obviously cheap as poles broken.

  • Glen says:

    Yes for the sake of our planet we need to choose carefully a purchase based on need rather than want quality over inferior, therefor as I look at it the less work I need to do the more time camping travelling our country and meeting great people .

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